PAINTINGS FROM A WORKSHOP

The Arizona Renaissance Art Guild had a workshop with Frank Covino in April this year, 2015, and since we plan on another one later this November, I thought I would post these paintings for everyone to see some of the processes and quality of work generated.  Keep in mind that all of them are in different stages of completion.  Some were just begun by new students in the workshop, and some are the result of weeks of work by seasoned artists.

Whether you are someone who has always wanted to paint but never had the time, or whether you are a seasoned artist wanting to learn different techniques, you are welcome to join our workshop in November.  Stay tuned.  As soon as I get definite dates, I’ll let you know.  Enjoy the photos:

PaintingWorkshopCovino4-2015Charlene1

Work in progress, by Charlene Higley

PaintingWorkshopCovino4-2015Charlene

PaintingWorkshopCovino4-2015

PaintingWorkshopCovino4-2015Bouguereau

PaintingWorkshopCovino4-2015Bill

PaintingWorkshopCovino4-2015Bill1

PaintingWorkshopCovino4-2015Glori

Work in progress, by Glori Robison

PaintingWorkshopCovino4-2015Glori1

PaintinWorkshopCovino4-2015Pat

Work in progress, by Pat McKinley

PaintingWorkshopCovino4-2015Pat1

PaintingWorkshopCovino4-2015Cheri

Work in progress, by Cheri Stucke

PaintingWorkshopCovino4-2015Cheri1

PaintingWorshopCovino4-2015Barb

Work in progress, by Barb Franelli

PaintinWorkshopCovino4-2015Karen

Work in progress, by Karen Schmeiser

PaintingWorkshopCovino4-2015Karen1

PaintingWorkshopCovino4-2015Karen2

PaintingWorkshopCovino4-2015Karen3

PaintingWorkshopCovino4-2015Karen4

PaintingWorkshopCovino4-2015RickFarmworker

PaintingWorkshopCovino4-2015Rick

PaintingWorkshopCovino4-2015Sariah

by Sariah Clonts

PaintingWorkshopCovinoFrank4-2015

Frank Covino, Modern Master and Teacher Extraordinaire

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All the best,

Marsha

 

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RAINBOW HUES

We have already “hammered away” at the importance of Value, so this is a good time to introduce the set of terms devised by Munsell, that help us discuss and reproduce color:

Hue–the name of a specific color as it appears in the color spectrum.
Value–the specific darkness or lightness of a color.
Chroma–the specific intensity (brightness or dullness) of a color.

Color_Wheel_Finished_Website1

Here, we will address “hue.” Although there are many varied color wheel designs, Munsell incorporates ten basic hues that come from the color of light as seen through a prism, or the rainbow spectrum. By shaping them in a circle, they become the color wheel. They are:

red-purple, red, yellow-red, yellow, yellow-green, green, blue-green, blue, blue-purple, purple

Every color falls into one of these ten basic HUE categories, or possibly between two of them, where reside the interhues.

Most artists have had at least one important teacher. Mine was/is Frank Covino. He designated tube names and value numbers for Munsell’s ten hues.

At first, you may be tempted to gloss over this list, but imagine going to the store and selecting the most useful green, red, or yellow, and then assigning its value as you go, all the while keeping in mind how the colors will all interact, and choosing those that work best together in the largest variety of situations–methinks not the easiest of tasks.  This work has been done for you, here:

Red-purple is Alizarin Crimson, which is a value 1 tube color.
Red is Cadmium Red Light, which is a value 5 tube color.
Yellow-red is Cadmium Orange, a value 7.
Yellow is Cadmium Yellow Light, a value 9.
Yellow-green is Pthalo Yellow Green, value 8.
Green is Cadmium Green, value 1.
Blue-green is Viridian Green, value 1.
Blue is Cerulean Blue, value 3 or 4 (depending on the brand).
Purple-blue is Ultramarine Blue, value 1.
Purple is Cobalt Violet, value 1.

These tube colors should visually disappear when placed on corresponding value numbers in the value chart (Don’t forget to squint, as discussed in the last post.).  If they look like freckles instead of disappearing, you know you either have them in the wrong place, or your value chart is not correct.  That’s why we use the Covino Palette–those values are already prepared for you to start using at once, without a lot of fumbling about.

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All the best,

Marsha