AN AMAZING ALTARPIECE, MOSAIC, AND WOODEN SCULPTURE

Even though they didn’t fit into my “paintings” category, I just had to show you three unique pieces I saw at the Getty and de Young museums.  The altarpiece room was exceptionally dark, so the following photos are the best I could get. Click on the text photos to make them readable.

The first is the Ecco Homo Altarpiece by Maerten van Heemskerck (1498-1574), Netherlands. About the artist:

HeemskerckNetherlands

About the Ecco Homo Altarpiece:

EccoHomo

EccoHomoAltarpieceHeemskerck

EccoHomo1

EccoHomoRevealed

The central panel:

EccoHomo2

About fading and discoloration:

EccoHomoFadedPaints

The reds:

RedsDiscoloration

The blues:

BluesDiscolorations

The greens:

GreensDiscoloration

When the altarpiece is closed, the following two figures are what you see:

EccoHomoStMargaretVerso

StMargaretOfAntiochHeemskerck

EccoHomoStJohnVerso

StJohnTheEvangelistHeemskerck

Here, you can see another exceptionally worthy altarpiece, the Ghent Altarpiece by Hubert and Jan van Eyck with extreme closeup, X-radiography, infrared macrophotography, infrared reflectography and so much more, at http://closertovaneyck.kikirpa.be/#home/sub=altarpiece

Next, look at the amazing artistry and detail of this mosaic:

PortraitOfCamilloRospigliosi

Portrait of Camillo Rospigliosi, about 1630-40, glass mosaic, by Giovanni Battista Calandra, Italian, 1586-1644

“This mosaic depicts Rospigliosi, brother of Pope Clement IX and Knight Commander of the Order of Santo Stefano, whose cross insignia he wears. Because mosaics are composed of many pieces of small stones, ceramic, or glass tiles, they preserve their color more permanently than paintings–thus making them an appropriate medium for the commemorative art of portraiture. Like the painters of this period, Calandra rendered his subjects with great realism.”

Here are some closeups:

CloseupOfCamilloRospigliosi

CloseupOfCamilloRospigliosi-1

CloseupOfCamilloRospigliosi-2

And finally, this sculpture is made of wood, believe it or not. It is called Saint Gines de La Jara, about 1692, by sculptor Luisa Roldán (aka La Roldana), Spanish, 1650-1706. The one who painted the sculpture (aka polychromer) is Tomas de Los Arcos, Spanish, born 1661.

P1070014

It was so tall that this upward shot was the best I could get. See the hands?

P1070011

And the feet?

P1070013

“Saint Ginés de La Jara exemplifies La Roldana’s artistic talents. The body is relatively straight and self-possessed, while the arms stretch outward. La Roldana masterfully worked the hands and feet, sculpting the veins and bones so that they dramatically push against the taut skin. The painting by her brother-in-law, Tomás de Los Arcos, enhances the carving. The statue displays the realistic expression found in Spanish religious imagery made for churches and convents in the second half of the 1600s.”

Note: All text in quotes is taken from the Getty or de Young museum placards posted beside paintings.

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